#StopRepeatingHistory​
#StopRepeatingHistory
#StopRepeatingHistory
#StopRepeatingHistory​
#StopRepeatingHistory
#StopRepeatingHistory
#StopRepeatingHistory

#StopRepeatingHistory

Satsumi as a child in WWII prison camp
Credit: Erin Shigaki, of Purple Gate Design

On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt issued Order 9066, authorizing the displacement and incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans on the West Coast.

With this order, the U.S. government uprooted the Japanese community from their homes and businesses, and incarcerated them for years in concentration camps, termed “War Relocation Authority Centers.”

When we see the migrant children, we recognize ourselves and we say:

#StopRepeatingHistory

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On Ft. Sill We Rallied en Masse

Ft. Sill is home to the indigenous boarding schools, the Japanese American prison camps during WWII, war resistors, and now is the planned site for more child detention.

Read More >> 

You Can Participate from Anywhere - Learn to Make a Crane:

tsuru folding instructions
Credit: Lauren Sumida

For stringing cranes, we ask that tsuru be strung with each tsuru touching the tsuru below it, with no loose thread or spaces between them. This is important, as it helps prevent the chain from tangling. If you would like to nest them inside each other, you may do so, but make sure they are not nested too tightly (otherwise the chain of tsuru cannot bend). Please make the chain of tsuru no longer than 4 feet/ 1.2 meters.

It’s best to use no. 5 embroidery thread and a big tapestry needle. Use a bead or button at both ends of the crane strand to help keep it intact. Please avoid use of fishing line or regular sewing thread to string the cranes–these tangle very easily.

Please make a loop at the top of the strung tsuru and fasten a large safety pin to it (not paper clips). Thank you! 

Adding a note with how many tsuru are on each strand helps us keep count, too! On average, about 40-50 tsuru per strand make about 4 feet in length. 

New York-based Japanese American Theodora holds up a chain of paper cranes
Here is an ideal tsuru chain--tsuru resting on top of each other on a string about 4 feet long (thank you to Theodora Yoshikami for demonstrating!)

We bring tsuru to our protest sites as a sign of peace and healing.

You can be a part of our actions by making and mailing paper cranes to:

JACL Chicago
5415 N. Clark St,
Chicago, IL, 60640

Tsuru for Solidarity is a volunteer group of Japanese-American descendants and survivors of US WWII Prison Camps.

 

Tsuru for Solidarity is a direct action, nonviolent project of allied organizations within the Japanese American community in collaboration with allied national organizations and networks. Initially created in March 2019, Tsuru for Solidarity was conceived as a way to give voice to the moral outrage of the Japanese American and Japanese Latin American community at the ongoing mass detentions in the United States and to show solidarity with front-line immigrant communities fighting injustice, mass incarceration and deportation. 

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